Crevecoeur Essay

Crevecoeur Essay (5 pages)

In your essay, please address the following questions.

1. How does Crevecoeur move from optimism to disillusionment?

2. Can his movement from optimism to disillusionment be said to foreshadow the American national experience? Feel free to refer to specific examples from the literature covered thus far in the class.

3. How can Crevecoeur’s observations on the evils of slavery be reconciled with his statement that “We have no princes, for whom we toil, starve, and bleed: we are the most perfect society now existing in the world. Here man is free as he ought to be..”? (Questions posed by authors George McMichael and James S. Leonard)

At the end of the essay, please copy and paste at least five different paragraphs from the letter below your essay. Choose paragraphs from different parts of the letter. Share your annotations at the end of your essay. Create comments boxes (like you did for other homework assignments) and write your reflections as you are reading.

Please follow the Organizational Plan below.

Organizational Plan for the essay:

1. Feel free to begin in such a way that will help you best grab your readers’ attentions. Follow

through by giving enough background information and presenting your argument in a thesis

statement.

2. You may next follow by discussing this question: How does Crevecoeur move from

optimism to disillusionment?

3. You can dedicate the next part to discussing this question: Can his movement from optimism to disillusionment be said to foreshadow the American national experience? Feel free to refer to specific examples from the literature covered thus far in the class.

4. The last segments can be dedicated to discussing this: How can Crevecoeur’s observations on the evils of slavery be reconciled with his statement that “We have no princes, for whom we toil, starve, and bleed: we are the most perfect society now existing in the world. Here man is free as he ought to be..”? (Questions posed by authors George McMichael and James S. Leonard)

Grading Rubric

Content, Support and Analysis

· Content: The student presented his or her own unique understanding of the literature. The student’s analysis was his or her own and did not rely on summaries or analysis from the internet or other sources. The student took complete ownership of understanding the literature on his or her own terms.

· Comments and interpretations reveal deep understanding of the material.

· Comments reveal a skillful application of theoretical ideas to the reading.

· The student has revealed his or her clear understanding of the material by providing adequate and solid references from the readings or other materials. In other words, the student has used carefully selected quotes.

· The student has referred to ideas presented by the theorists (if needed).

· Where needed, the student has explained the progression of ideas seen in literary movements and how literary movements respond to one another. Or, the writer may compare and contrast literary texts and historical events in a skilful manner. Or, the author may explain and analyze the significance of authors’ and literatures’ responses to historical events and movements

· The student’s comments demonstrate critical understanding of the topic by expanding the issue, bringing in additional perspectives, and promoting additional discussion.

· The student remains focused on the topic under study.

Organizational Plan

The writer has carefully structured his or her ideas in a clear and logical manner.

All the sentences are carefully connected to one another. The reader does not have to work to figure out what the connections between the sentences are. Paragraphs are also well linked to one another.

Introduction:

The attention getter grabs the interests of the readers. It may retell a dramatic short story which captures the essence of the essay’s main ideas. The attention getter may include a question or reflection.

The introduction of the essay prepares a context for the rest of the essay. It includes a summary of the main idea of the poem.

At the end of the introduction, the writer has placed a thesis statement that presents a forceful argument. The thesis statement can be more than one sentence. It is meaningful and guides the reader to what to expect throughout the essay.

Conclusion:

There may be a signal word that begins the conclusion and suggests the essay is ending. While the conclusion may stress the main argument, it is not devoted to summarizing the main ideas of each body paragraph. Instead, the conclusion resonates with the reader because the writer has creatively ended with a thoughtful reflection. Or, perhaps the writer has ended by reflecting on how the issue discussed in the essay is relevant to today’s world. Or, what usually helps writers is creating a conclusion that explains why your writing is significant and the greater ramifications behind your insights and ideas.

Editing, Style and Formatting

· There were few or no errors in the writing, mechanics and citation. The writing is clear and the student has made sophisticated stylistic choices.

· The student carefully leads into the quotes and then comments on them.

Academic Effort

· Contributions were made in a timely way and displayed a high level of engagement.

· The student has obviously taken this assignment seriously.

· The student has gone above and beyond the requirements.