Experimental System and Procedures

Objective of this lab is to achieve a better understanding of the head loss across the system of 4 different styles of electrical pumps. Generating a pump curve relating our head loss to flow rate at a high and low power setting. This will allow us to find our most efficient operating rate for each of the different pumps. We then look at how friction factor interacts with the flow rate by controlling the gate valve increases the Reynolds number which contains a reducing velocity leading to greater head loss through the valve because of the increased pressure change through the pump.

Experimental System and Procedures

The system involved with this lab consists of a bucket acting as a tank containing our water supply which we attach a line to the intake end of our electric pump to in order to move the our fluid through the discharge tube through both the regulation valve and rotameters back into the main tank as shown in Appendix A, Figure 1. Using the isolation valve we can isolate the pump for changing them out by closing it and prime the pump when it’s opened. There are two pressure gauges for this system, one before and after the pump. The regulation valve after the pump is used to control flow and evaluated for friction factor during the experiment.

Calibration of the rotameters must be done before effectively evaluating the pressure gradient over different flow rates. By taking the time it takes to fill up a portion of 2,000 mL graduated cylinder we can relate an actual flow rate to a prediction curve from the calibration process. Being able to relate the rotameter reading to our trend line allows us to accurately make flow readings throughout the experiment.

Using the calibrated rotameters we can record the relation of head pressure to flow rate through the gate valve at different flow settings. The flows interaction with pressure is what generates our pump curves. Completing this for the Gear, Vane, Peristaltic, and Centrifugal pumps at