s://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0PPvYlGqL8This is Film link. Each question need one page. Question 1: Before the Collaborate, on the FILM Obviously, in watching the film, you are experiencing a finished work of art. As we’ve discussed, the playscript is only a blue print, a potential for future art / a future for potential art; so, to be frank, we’re dealing with apples and oranges. With that understanding, discuss the differences between the film and the play. What changes were made in the adaptation of the play into the screenplay? Why do you think they were made? The playscript presents much potential for theatricality (“embracing the distance”). What theatrical conventions might be used in a stage production? How do they compare and contrast to the cinematic conventions realized in the film or, if you can make these inferences, how do they compare to the potential for cinematic convention in the screenplay?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0PPvYlGqL8This is Film link.

Each question need one page.

Question 1: Before the Collaborate, on  the FILM

Obviously, in watching the film, you are experiencing a finished work of art. As we’ve discussed, the playscript is only a blue print, a potential for future art / a future for potential art; so, to  be frank, we’re dealing with apples and oranges. With that understanding, discuss the differences between the film and the play. What changes were made in the adaptation of the play into the screenplay? Why do you think they were made? The playscript presents much potential for theatricality (“embracing the distance”). What theatrical conventions might be used in a stage production? How do they compare and contrast to the cinematic conventions realized in the film or, if you can make these inferences, how do they compare to the potential for cinematic convention in the screenplay? DOES the film have a thematic drive that is, in any way, different from that of the play?  If the thematic content remains consistent, do you think Nichols creates a potentially similar “AESTHETIC” or does the change of medium – and all of the economic, cultural and marketing concerns (ETCETERA) that this change implies – necessitate a quintessentially different aesthetic?  If  so, does this actually alter the thematic message?  Can we produce a piece of theatrical literature for the stage and (interpreted as a screen play) produce a work based on that same narrative as a film, while MAINTAINING THE SAME NOMINATIVE STATEMENT??  (Again, guys, in a sense, this a bullshit question; as you know, the film version is already produced and we can watch it while there is no current, Mike Nichols-directed staging of Edson’s play. I am asking you to be imaginative and apply the theory with which we have been  working to the concept here.)  Nichols is an acclaimed director who has been lauded for hos work on stage productions such as Harold Pinter’s  BETRAYAL and Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN.  As such, I think the  film attempts to hold on to its theatrical source material through cinematic conventions that are decidedly theatrical. What are they and what do they do? Are they effective? How?  In particular, I want you to comment on the OPENING SCENE and the CONCLUSION of each. How are they different and, relative to theatrical and cinematic potential, why do you think they are different?

Question 2: Before the Collaborate on the PLAY

Armed with your sharpened understanding of theatricality, theme, motif and symbol, tear this one apart. One thing you might want to think about is the difference between Shakespeare and John Donne (as perceived by Vivian through the tutelage of Professor Ashford). Relate this comparison to the title and what you perceive to be the main theme(s). You might also think about the ironies of Vivian’s “treatment” and her experiences in the hospital with her former student. Does Vivian have regrets? What are they?  During our discussion of IN THE BLOOD, we discussed the classical ideal of Tragedy.  IN particular, we talked about the tragic hero’s hamartia, or tragic flaw.  What is Vivian’s hamartia?

Chapter 3: After the Collaborate

  1. Flashback are undeniably theatrical in that they explicitly “embrace the distance”. Name two thematic categories on which the theatrical convention of the flashback may serve as an articulate commentary.  In other words, to WHAT POTENTIAL THEME(S) does this convention ADD INFORMATION?
  1. The archived Collaborate I gave you for W;T included the discussion of a dominant motif that is ALSO a literary device derived from a stock character of Greek Comedy. Name 2 kinds of the literary device that gets its name from the Eiron and site examples of each in the play.

 

  1. During this archive, I suggest that Vivian hides from her humanity and avoids real connection by distancing herself using the dense, scholarly and erudite nature of Donne’s work. Do you hide at all?  What do you use?

 

  1. Why did you think the filmmaker changed the end?
  2. They say, “Those who can, do. Thise who cannot, teach.”  What does this mean and do you agree?