The nineteenth century was a time of continuous change for the world due to the industrial revolution. All aspects of society saw the benefits, and sometimes, the drawbacks of advancing technology. Music was generally only performed in a church setting or for the extremely wealthy. “In earlier times, musicians were usually employed by either the church or the court and were merely servants to aristocratic circles” (Dobney, 2004).

The nineteenth century was a time of continuous change for the world due to the industrial revolution.  All aspects of society saw the benefits, and sometimes, the drawbacks of advancing technology.  Music was generally only performed in a church setting or for the extremely wealthy. “In earlier times, musicians were usually employed by either the church or the court and were merely servants to aristocratic circles” (Dobney, 2004).  With the introduction of the industrial revolution many things happened. The largest was the creation of the middle class. “This new economic strata consisted of a larger number of people with more expendable income and more leisure time than had ever existed before. Musical extravaganzas that triumphed the musician or composer gained popularity with the masses of concertgoers. Beginning with Beethoven, composers began to arrange large concerts in order to introduce their works to the public. As audiences desired more, composers wrote larger musical works and demanded more of performers and their instruments” (Dobney, 2004). The industrial revolution allowed instruments to be produced that were more reliable, more readily available,  and for different and new types of instruments to produced. “New types of orchestral winds that allowed for greater facility and more accurate playing were introduced”(Dobney, 2004).

Music was now made and composed for the  public rather than a small group or a formal mass. Audiences could now go watch a performance as a form of leisure. As the performers began to realize that they can perform to larger and larger crowds, the first musical superstars were born. “Musicians who could dazzle and amaze their audiences by their virtuosity became the first musical superstars. The two most famous nineteenth-century examples were the violinist Nicolò Paganini (1782“1840) and the pianist Franz Liszt (1811“1886). Both dazzled audiences throughout Europe with their performances, elevating the status of the musician from servant to demi-god. Their fame grew throughout Europe and their likenesses would be recorded in a variety of visual arts”(Dobney, 2004).  Some of the largest contributions of this societal shift was that music was now available to the common person. Children of middle class families could now learn music and take lessons. It was no longer only for the wealthy. This was also a big time for nationalism in music which had big impacts on the creations of the day. “Nationalism constitutes a belief which, in the course of the nineteenth century… became the governing idea without always being held by those in government… the belief that it was to his nation – and not to a creed, a dynasty, or a class – that a citizen owed the first duty in a clash of loyalties. This political claim, fused with the idea that it was the spirit of the people (der Volksgeist) which provided inspiration in the arts and life, was the dominant attitude of the bourgeois nationalism of the nineteenth century”(Miles, 1985). This new train of thought let composers create new music that would appeal to the listener on a patriotic level, but also allow the composer to experiment, push boundaries, and try to outperform the rival composer. This lead to the creation of a wide variety of music and pushed the creative levels to new heights. “Another way nationalism made an impact in the music of the nineteenth century is from an aesthetic standpoint. The dominant principle was one of novelty and originality. The tradition of imitation was now condemned, and unfamiliar music was now considered by be authentic. However, with art music being confronted with the dillemma of having to abandon aristocratic and esoteric goals to become democratic and popular, the ideal of popularity came into direct conflict with the ideal of novelty and originality, which required a great deal of intellectual understanding and was not appreciated by the general public. Musical nationalism provided the appearance of familiarity so the composer could be original and artistic while the listener could identify with the music on a patriotic level”(Miles, 1985).

References:

Dobney, J. (2004, October). Nineteenth-Century Classical Music | Essay | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Retrieved from http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/amcm/hd_amcm.htm

Miles, J. (1985). Nationalism and Music in the Romantic Era. Retrieved from http://hunsmire.tripod.com/music/nationalism.html

Sametria Whitfield
unit 5 Db Romantic Era Changes

 

     Hello everyone! I hope you are having a great holiday.Thanks to all of our soldiers for what you do to protect us. I think the population was growing and people wanted to hear other styles of music.According to metmuseum.org, They wanted bigger places and parlors for people to be able to go and visit. Romantics valued the natural world and idealized the life of the common man which rebelled against social conventions, and stressed the importance of emotional in Art. Thr rising of middle class people wanted to access more musical performances and education. New democratic ideas and Industrial Revolution swept through Europe which changed the daily lives of citizens at all ages.www.metmuseum.org

According to metmuseum.org, some of the largest contributions to social, cultural, and economic shifts were rich interchanges of ideas throughout Europe.The chruches played major roles as well and the lives of muscians, composers, and makers of musical instruments were greatly altered by these social changes as well. www.metmuseum.org

References:

Tarasti, E. (2012), Semiotics of Classical Music: How Mozart, Brahms, and Wagner Talk to us, Berlin.Dr Gruyter. Mouton

Nineteenth-Century Classical Music, www.metmuseum.org